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James Dynko

Obituary of James Daniel Dynko

James D. "Jim" Dynko, 74, of Peru passed away on Wednesday, April 27, 2022, surrounded by his loved ones at CVPH Medical Center. He was born in Troy, N.Y. on November 23, 1947. He is survived by his wife, Julie Dynko and their children Karly Dynko, a Peru Elementary teacher; Connor Dynko, a city police officer, and his partner Kylee Hemingway. He is also survived by his children from a previous marriage: Marcus Dynko and his wife Vicki of Bellingham, M.A.; Dennis Dynko of Buffalo; Michael Dynko of Albany; and Rhonda Bryant of Saranac Lake; his stepson Eric Silver; a brother, Robert Dynko of South Carolina; his mother-in-law Linda Masters; and his very best friend for many years, Bob Grady; as well as grandchildren, Jordan, Hunter, Cheyenne, Ryan, Damian, Nathan, and Philip. He was predeceased by his parents, Metro and Juanita Dynko, grandchildren Brooke and Kyle, several aunts and uncles; his father-in-law, Nicholas Masters; as well as many furry friends. Jim joined the Press-Republican as a general-assignment reporter in 1971 after graduating from Plattsburgh State. He had also spent three years in the Navy during the Vietnam War, based at Coronado Naval Base in San Diego 1967 through 1969. He grew up in Albany, and nearby Delmar, the son of Daniel and Juanita Dynko. He graduated from Bethlehem Central High School, though not the stellar student you'd think he'd have to be to become the editor of a daily newspaper. Yet he developed alternative talents and skills, such as imagination, creativity and a magnetic personality that would outshine a report card. Jim attended Utica College and graduated from Hudson Valley Community College before transferring to SUNY Plattsburgh. He played baseball and was even lead singer in a band – or so he tells us! He also developed a love of racing and was able to compete in local speedways. Jim was thrilled when the owners of Airborne Speedway gave him the opportunity to race one more time in his later years. At the Press-Republican, he covered all levels of government and regularly produced feature stories, but his heart belonged on the police beat, where he reported on numerous crimes, fires, and trials. It was during those engagements that he became well known in the law-enforcement community. Eventually he completed training and served as a volunteer firefighter for Rescue Hose No. 5 and an emergency medical technician for the Keeseville Volunteer Fire Department. In 1979, following a series of newsroom promotions, he succeeded Norbert Walter as editor of the P-R. He navigated the nationwide emerging newsroom transition from typewriters to computers successfully. Under his leadership, not only did the paper graduate into 21st Century technology, but circulation swelled from approximately 14,000 to 26,000. During his tenure the paper won numerous reporting awards from United Press International, The Associated Press, and the New York Newspaper Publishers Association. He had overseen the newspaper's expansion to a seven-day-a-week operation. The Sunday paper, which he created, had become the flagship edition. As far as can be determined Jim spent more time as editor of the Press-Republican than anyone. Jim was also known as 'Ted' in several articles written by his best friend and colleague Bob "Bahb" Grady. The articles revolved around funny (and not so funny to him) adventures that happened to Jim and occasionally to family members as well. He was a great source for Grady's truly witty commentaries. Julie (Dynko) would hear belly laughs from her colleagues at Peru School as they recounted the trials and tribulations of poor Jim! Not many people knew who Ted was but…the secret is out! Jim had a great interest in politics and loved to debate issues with family and friends especially his father-in-law, Nick, who was very opinionated. In his spare time, he fought fires, saved lives, and coached youth sports. He became perhaps better known in his home community of Peru for coaching and umpiring than he was as editor of the paper. He was also known for helping his children's preschool and elementary school teachers by volunteering in the classroom, cafeteria, and running occasional errands such as bringing last minute supplies needed for projects. Jim's children were a source of joy. He never missed an opportunity to attend any of their activities. He was their biggest cheerleader. It wasn't unusual to find him eating lunch with them in the elementary school cafeteria. Later Jim enjoyed telling stories and teaching life lessons to both his children and their friends. He maintained frequent contact with them as they grew up which included lengthy phone calls – he wasn't the best texter. He was a very proud dad! Jim was loved by his community. He truly cared about everyone he met. People smile when talking about their encounters and visits with him. He helped anyone that needed it. He would mow lawns, run errands, and even went out during a winter storm for dog food for an elderly friend. Jim was also very appreciative of those that helped him in any way. He thanked the doctors and nurses in the hospital, even when he wasn't feeling his best. He'd ask them how their day was going and how they felt! He never wanted anyone to go out of their way for him, but he was very grateful whenever they did. He will be missed by many, especially his children and very dear friend Bob. Calling hours will be held Thursday, May 5, 2022 from 3:30 to 6 pm at the Hamilton Funeral Home 294 Mannix Road, Peru. Military honors will follow the celebration of Jim's life, Thursday evening. A private graveside service will occur at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Peru Volunteer Fire Department or the Elmore SPCA. Arrangements are in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Peru, 643-9055.
Thursday
5
May

Visitation at Funeral Home

3:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Thursday, May 5, 2022
Hamilton Funeral Home Inc.
294 Mannix Road
Peru, New York, United States

Final Resting Place

God's Acre Cemetery
Maiden Lane
Peru, New York, United States